Living ideas based on leading architects and designers

Danielle Brustman, interior designer

Danielle Brustman: “Surround yourself with design and pieces that make you happy and inspired. Don’t be influenced by trends.”Recognition:Justin McManus

Best Invention A Bodum coffee flask – it’s a great invention and I use it every day because I like to have more than one cup of coffee. I also love cordless lamps from Bicoca. I’m obsessed with lighting devices that you can place anywhere and not see the wires. They offer more flexibility when creating a mood.

From the past I keep going back to the 1960s and 1970s for inspiration for my own designs. Three favorites are Vernor Panton’s Flowerpot VP Pendant, Pierre Paulin’s funky chair and Pierre Cardin’s furniture, which is still in production today.

Now hot I love Melbourne’s vibrant design community and seeing how they experiment with materials and practices. Aesthetically, design is getting bolder and I love that. Jessie French makes exciting pieces out of seaweed and has done great research on how to use them in housewares and how to make them durable. Mycelium Studios also conducts experimental work using mushrooms to create various shapes that can be used for building materials and objects.

The future Interiors are becoming more and more playful in the house. We want multifunctional spaces that offer us more than before.

rule to life Surround yourself with design and pieces that make you happy and inspired. Don’t be influenced by trends. The most important thing is that your answer is authentic and that these objects bring you joy.

Kerrie Brown, interior designer

Kerrie Brown:

Kerrie Brown: “I treat interiors like works of art, making them interesting, beautiful, whimsical and warm with a touch of humour.”

Best Invention Computers and humans working together allow for a tremendous increase in creativity – think Photoshop and digital printing, 3D printing, smartphones. It has opened up many possibilities and contributes significantly to the democratization of design.

From the past Mid-century designers like Ray and Charles Eames and Saarinen and Noguchi whose pieces are so well designed they really have not been surpassed.

Now hot I love biophilic design – a yearning to live with nature, in both our indoor and outdoor environments. This goes hand in hand with the importance of sustainable materials. I also love reinterpreted classics. I’ve always enjoyed playing around with historical and classic imagery from different times and cultures, and mixing them with an eye to the past and an eye to the future.

The future Digital technology is enabling people to open up a world of possibilities that we could never have imagined until recently. I’m blown away by Michael Hansmeyer and the idea of ​​breaking free from prejudice, prejudice, education and experience to see where that goes in design. His work is more oriented towards forms designed by nature, which I think must be a direction for the future. I also think that computers will free everyone to be their own designer to some extent, and designers will become exotic specialists, working in small businesses designing one-off or bespoke, highly manufactured pieces.

rule to life My design process is about mixing, layering and creating an emotional response to wallpaper, textiles or art prints. I’m pretty instinctive when it comes to design and color. My approach to decoration is similar. I treat interiors like a work of art, making them interesting, beautiful, whimsical and warm with a touch of humor.

Helen Kontouris, Industrial furniture designer

Helen Kontouris:

Helen Kontouris: “When you look at something that is a limited edition or possibly a one-off, you have an emotional quality and attachment to that object.”

Best Invention One of the simplest and most amazing design inventions is the paper cupcake holder. They’re inexpensive, can be baked at high temperatures, can hold wet liquids, and the end result is a perfectly formed cupcake. The bicycle is another great invention; The simplicity of the design and the ability to get you where you need to go is a winner.

From the past Minimalism suits my design style and the way I like to surround myself at home.

Now hot There is a clear trend towards authenticity in design. I think that making products that are ecologically safe is a trend that is starting to gain momentum. Sustainability is built into the product and you wouldn’t even know it. Locally produced products will remain in the face of what is happening around the world. People want to know how products are made. Buy less and buy well.

Clockwise from top left: A sculptural concrete staircase designed by Koos De Keijzer;  Danielle Brustman's

Clockwise from top left: A sculptural concrete staircase designed by Koos De Keijzer; Danielle Brustman’s “Meteorite” light built with Edward Linacre; Helen Kontouris’ Transmogrify chair.

The future Limited edition pieces. When you think of quick design there is no emotional resonance associated with these objects, whereas when you look at something that is a limited edition or possibly a one-off, you have emotional quality and attachment to that object. That’s what people want now.

rule to life Curiosity, if only because I am fascinated by people and the way they interact with objects. I ask too many questions and want to know about the people around me and that influences and influences my work.

Koos de Keijzer, Founder and Director of DKO Architecture

Koos de Keijzer says that the future of design is

Koos de Keijzer says that the future of design is “to embrace the environment, to understand heating and cooling and to confront the quality of life”.Recognition:Jacob Brown

Best Invention The best design inventions are the ones that make me happy; Rooms that touch all the senses. I especially like Lapidus’ use of a curve – so lush and sensual. Lapidus was a modernist who loved neo-baroque and natural forms.

From the past As a Dutchman, I’m steeped in modernism; The future-oriented, all-solving nature of modernity appeals to me. Architects such as Alvar Aalto, who combined modernity with nature, are particularly interesting. I love the mid-century LA modernists like Craig Ellwood and Schindler because they combine craft and drama.

Now hot I love the connection to nature – we can learn so much from it. I recently designed a 42 story tower on the Gold Coast based on a pandanus palm.

The future Accepting the environment, understanding heating and cooling and dealing with the quality of life. I recently renovated my farmhouse in the Cobaw Ranges and it has taught me so much about the great outdoors.

rule to life Every design has to be about love, love, love. Do what brings you joy. I love modern furniture and I am happy every time I look at my furniture. Be aware of what is happening worldwide. There are so many websites that are full of beautiful objects. Keep an open mind and examine nature carefully. But most importantly, keep it simple and sexy.

Alec Tzannes, Architect and Director of tzannes

Alec Tzannes: “The biggest trend shaping our current thinking is recognizing the land and integrating the thinking of indigenous peoples about the environment and how it connects us to the past.”

Alec Tzannes: “The biggest trend shaping our current thinking is recognizing the land and integrating the thinking of indigenous peoples about the environment and how it connects us to the past.”Recognition:Toby Burrows

Best Invention Mr. Otis’ 1853 Safety Elevator is an incredible design. Digital technology also enables a more precise and broader design process by integrating scientific thinking, which is important for carbon-regenerative designs.

From the past I love that you built a house well and it lasted forever. It was about making the detailing last, taking care to drain water properly, choosing materials and detailing appropriately. Brick used as a brick. I wish this trend would come back.

Now hot The biggest trend shaping our current thinking is the recognition of land and the integration of indigenous peoples’ thinking about the environment and how it connects us to the past. We achieve this through efficient use of space and the respectful use of resources. And the thought of animals and their habitats makes us more sensitive to the design of our homes and gardens.

Gone are the days when a home and its surroundings were viewed as a construct of a value system deeply rooted in the notion that we are superior to nature. We should approach building houses from the point of view that we are not only the stewards of the land, but also of the habitat of all other living beings that use this land. This is changing the way we design.

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The future We are at a turning point. Design reflects where we’ve been and where we should be going – it’s a litmus test. Our short-termism has created buildings that last 20 to 30 years. We design for a sustainable future.

rule to life Leaving the place better than you found it. It can be expressed in different ways. One should be scientific. We cannot design what is beautiful from a personal point of view. We must integrate scientific review of materials and construction to reduce our carbon footprint and create regenerative carbon. A second way is to build things beautiful but practical.

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